Jailbreak by Thin Lizzy 1976 Vertigo UK / Mercury Records USA

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Jailbreak by Thin Lizzy 1976 Vertigo UK / Mercury Records USA

Jailbreak by Thin Lizzy 1976 Vertigo UK / Mercury Records USA
Jailbreak by Thin Lizzy 1976 Vertigo UK / Mercury Records USA

Jailbreak is the sixth studio album by Irish hard rock band Thin Lizzy, released in 1976. It proved to be the band’s commercial breakthrough in the US, and the only Thin Lizzy album with a certification (in this case, Gold) in that country. The singles include “Jailbreak” and “The Boys Are Back in Town”, the latter being Thin Lizzy’s biggest hit.

1. “Jailbreak”     4:01
2. “Angel from the Coast”   3:03
3. “Running Back”   3:13
4. “Romeo and the Lonely Girl”   3:55
5. “Warriors”   4:09
6. “The Boys Are Back in Town”   4:27
7. “Fight or Fall”   3:45
8. “Cowboy Song”   5:16
9. “Emerald”   4:03

Total length  36:15

Thin Lizzy are a rock band formed in Dublin, Ireland in 1969. Two of the founding members, drummer Brian Downey and bass guitarist and lead vocalist Phil Lynott, met while still in school. Lynott led the group throughout their recording career of twelve studio albums, writing most of the material. Thin Lizzy’s most successful songs, “Whiskey in the Jar” (a traditional Irish ballad), “Jailbreak” and “The Boys Are Back in Town”, were all major international hits. After Lynott’s death in 1986, various incarnations of the band emerged over the years based initially around guitarists Scott Gorham and John Sykes, though Sykes left the band in 2009. Gorham later continued with a new line-up including Downey.

Thin Lizzy are the bodhisattvas of hard pop. They took memorable, fist-pumping butter-churned guitar riffs and blended them with a deep and constant melodicism.

AllMusic critic John Dougan has written that “As the band’s creative force, Lynott was a more insightful and intelligent writer than many of his ilk, preferring slice-of-life working-class dramas of love and hate influenced by Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Bruce Springsteen, and virtually all of the Irish literary tradition.”[2] Van Morrison, Jeff Beck and Jimi Hendrix were major influences during the early days of the band, and later influences included the pioneering twin lead guitars found in Wishbone Ash and American artists Little Feat and Bob Seger.

Philip Parris “Phil” Lynott (20 August 1949 – 4 January 1986) was an Irish musician, singer and songwriter. His most commercially successful group was Thin Lizzy, of which he was a founding member, the principal songwriter, lead vocalist and bassist. He later also found success as a solo artist.

Growing up in Dublin in the 1960s, Lynott fronted several bands as a lead vocalist, most notably Skid Row alongside Gary Moore, before learning the bass guitar and forming Thin Lizzy in 1969. After initial success with “Whiskey in the Jar”, the band found strong commercial success in the mid-1970s with hits such as “The Boys Are Back in Town”, “Jailbreak” and “Waiting for an Alibi”, and became a popular live attraction due to the combination of Lynott’s vocal and songwriting skills and the use of dual lead guitars. Towards the end of the 1970s, Lynott also embarked upon a solo career, published two books of poetry, and after Thin Lizzy disbanded, he assembled and fronted the band Grand Slam, of which he was the leader until it folded in 1985.

He subsequently had major UK success with Moore with the song “Out in the Fields”, followed by the minor hit “Nineteen”, before his death on 4 January 1986. He remains a popular figure in the rock world, and in 2005, a statue to his memory was erected in Dublin.

One of the first “hard” bands who weren’t based in the blues, old-school rock forms, or pyrotechnics and who favored compact, listener-friendly song forms, they profoundly influenced U2, the Sex Pistols, and Bon Jovi; even Green Day echoes their mix of riff, melody, and attitude.
Bassist/vocalist Phil Lynott was one of the great stars of the 1970s, and on top of all that, Thin Lizzy also invented the modern power ballad (“The Cowboy Song” is the prototype for every hair-band slow-dance prom song ever written).

After their previous two albums, Nightlife and Fighting, failed to generate sales, Thin Lizzy were given one last chance by their record label, Vertigo, to make a successful record. The band wrote songs and collected ideas in a studio in Buckinghamshire in late 1975, then convened at Ramport Studios in London in the new year. The band selected John Alcock as their producer, as he had worked in the studio extensively. The band worked diligently through February on the album. However, Gorham and Robertson felt that the speed at which it was completed adversely affected its quality. Both stated that the tightness of the songs made the album feel rigid. In particular, Robertson said that he would have liked more freedom to improvise on his lead guitar parts. Gorham also criticized Alcock’s production, saying that he didn’t particularly care for his guitar tone on the album.

Lynott’s last years were dogged by drug and alcohol dependency leading to his collapse on 25 December 1985, at his home in Kew. He was discovered by his mother, who was not aware of his dependence on heroin. She contacted his wife Caroline, who knew about it and immediately identified the problem as serious.[66] After Caroline drove him to a drug clinic at Clouds House in East Knoyle, near Warminster, he was taken to Salisbury Infirmary where he was diagnosed as suffering from septicaemia.[3][56] Although he regained consciousness enough to speak to his mother, his condition worsened by the start of the new year and he was put on a respirator.[67] He died of pneumonia and heart failure due to septicaemia in the hospital’s intensive care unit on 4 January 1986, at the age of 36.

Lynott’s funeral was held at St Elizabeth’s Church, Richmond on 9 January 1986, with most of Thin Lizzy’s ex-members in attendance, followed by a second service at Howth Parish Church on 11 January. He was buried in St Fintan’s Cemetery, Sutton, Dublin.

phil-lynott-and-thin-lizzy

Thin Lizzy’s ‘The Boys Are Back In Town’ is a rowdy, hard rocking piece whose twin guitar lead solidified the song’s position as one of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time. It’s a song dedicated to Thin Lizzy’s fans, working class young men who loved to go out and have a great time; fitting, then, that this rowdy 1977 performance is everything that that crowd of young men could ever want!

The footage that this performance of ‘The Boys Are Back In Town’ is cut from is appropriately named Live And Dangerous, one of Thin Lizzy’s finest live performances of their entire career. It’s been hailed as one of the best live albums and later, concert videos of all time, and Phil Lynott’s performance and masterful approach to both song selection and execution are still critically acclaimed after nearly 40 years.

It’s impossible to watch this incredible concert footage and not grin from ear to ear. Whether it’s Phil Lynott’s onstage acrobatics that get you or the twin guitar duel between guitarists Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson, you’re in for a fantastic time!

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The Boys Are Back In Town

Lyrics: The Boys Are Back In Town Lyrics

Guess who just got back today
Them wild-eyed boys that had been away
Haven’t changed that much to say
But man, I still think them cats are crazy


They were askin’ if you were around
How you was, where you could be found
Told ’em you were livin’ downtown
Drivin’ all the old men crazy


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town again)


You know that chick that used to dance a lot
Every night she’d be on the floor, shakin’ what she got
When I say she was cool she was red hot
I mean, she was steamin’


And that time over at Johnny’s place,
Well, this chick got up and she slapped Johnny’s face
Man, we just fell about the place
If that chick don’t want to know, forget her


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)
The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town again)


Spread the word around
Guess who’s back in town


Just spread the word around


Friday night they’ll be dressed to kill
Down at Dino’s Bar ‘n’ Grill
The drink will flow and the blood will spill
And if the boys want to fight, you better let ’em


That jukebox in the corner blastin’ out my favorite song
The nights are getting longer, it won’t be long
Won’t be long till the summer comes
Now that the boys are here again


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)


The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town)
Spread the word around
The boys are back in town
(The boys are back in town again)


The boys are back in town again
Been hangin’ down at Dino’s
The boys are back in town again


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