Chill Out by John Lee Hooker

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Chill Out by John Lee Hooker
Chill Out by John Lee Hooker
Chill Out by John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker (c. August 22, 1912 – June 21, 2001) was an American blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist. The son of a sharecropper, he rose to prominence performing an electric guitar-style adaptation of Delta blues. Hooker often incorporated other elements, including talking blues and early North Mississippi Hill country blues. He developed his own driving-rhythm boogie style, distinct from the 1930s–1940s piano-derived boogie-woogie.
Some of his best known songs include “Boogie Chillen'” (1948), “Crawling King Snake” (1949), “Dimples” (1956), “Boom Boom” (1962), and “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” (1966). Several of his later albums, including The Healer (1989), Mr. Lucky (1991), Chill Out (1995), and Don’t Look Back (1997) were album chart successes in the U.S. and U.K. Additionally, Don’t Look Back won a Grammy Award in 1998.
 
Chill Out by John Lee Hooker
1.
Chill Out (Things Gonna Change)
4:48
2.
Deep Blue Sea
4:09
3.
Kiddio
3:12
4.
Medley: Serves Me Right To Suffer/Syndicator
6:28
5.
One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer
3:27
6.
Tupelo
3:59
7.
Woman On My Mind
5:30
8.
Annie Mae
5:20
9.
Too Young
 4:46
10.
Talkin’ The Blues
3:45
11.
If You’ve Never Been In Love
4:50
12.
We’ll Meet Again
4:02
13.
Down So Low (Bonus Track)
3:42
14.
Fire Down Below (Bonus Track)
3:51
John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
The Passing Of A Blues Legend: John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker, the gifted, charismatic blues guitar player and singer, died in his sleep at his home in Los Altos, California, aged 80, on June 21, 2001.
Survived by eight children and 19 grandchildren, Hooker was born August 22, 1922 in Clarksdale, Mississippi, the fourth in a family of 11 children. Hooker’s father was a sharecrop farmer and Baptist minister who strongly discouraged his son’s early interest in the blues. Like so many other singers of his generation and background, his first musical experiences were of singing gospel music in church. His introduction to the blues guitar came via his musician stepfather, Will Moore.
At the age of 14 he ran away from his home to Memphis, Tennessee where he met and played with Robert Lockwood, a close relation to the legendary blues guitarist Robert Johnson. Hooker and Lockwood played together in and around the Memphis area for a couple of years before the young musician moved to Cincinnati where he spent 10 years as a blues/gospel singer playing in local groups.
In 1943 he moved to Detroit, hoping to supplement his music income with a job in the auto industry. After various jobs he eventually found work as a janitor in one of the city’s auto plants. Detroit became his home for many years and he became a regular act at blues clubs and bars in the city’s Hastings Street area. In 1948 he made his first recording, Boogie Chillin’, which rose to number one on the US rhythm and blues charts and became a big commercial success for Modern Records, his recording company. Most of Hooker’s early recordings were performed solo or with a second guitarist—only one or two of his early albums were with backup bands. This was not typical of his live performances, which generally featured piano, drums and guitar backing.
Hooker recorded prolifically and successfully for Modern Records during the late 1940s and early 1950s, producing some of his classic songs such as In The Mood and Crawling King Snake. But he became increasingly unhappy with low royalty payments from Modern Records and started to record under other names such as Delta John, Texas Slim, Little Pork Chops, John L. Booker, John Lee Cooker and various others to avoid contractual obligations and raise extra revenue.
By the late 1950s the market for Hooker’s music had begun to wane, encouraging him to look for new audiences. He began performing at folk clubs and festivals, including the Newport Folk Festival, where audiences of mainly young white listeners began to appreciate what black audiences had long recognised. In the 1960s his reputation grew among younger up-and-coming rock musicians. Many British groups, such as The Rolling Stones, The Animals and The Yardbirds, regularly cited him as a major influence. In fact, Hooker’s work was more widely recognised outside the US at this time and he toured Britain and the continent every year during the 1960s.
But popular interest in blues music continued to decline throughout the late 1970s and early 1980s, affecting Hooker’s career. This hiatus ended in 1989 with The Healer album. Described by many as a “revival” for John Lee Hooker, The Healer was not so much a revival as an extension of the base he had built up in the preceding decades. The album gathered together musicians and close friends such as Carlos Santana, Bonnie Raitt and Robert Cray and became a catalyst for renewed interest in the veteran artist’s work. It sold more copies than any previous Hooker album and won him a Grammy Award for the best blues album.
John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
Similar recordings followed, including Mr Lucky, which had Ry Cooder, Van Morrison and Albert Collins as guest musicians and became the first blues album to reach the top three in the British charts. The best album from this period is Boom, Boom (1992), featuring the classic title track along with nine other Hooker originals, including solo tracks I’m Bad Like Jessie James and Sugar Mama.
Much of the blues of Hooker’s birthplace was played on acoustic steel-stringed guitars, often open-tuned to produce a single chord when strummed. Combined with raw and emotional vocals capturing the harsh life facing blacks in the Mississippi Delta, it became known as the Mississippi Delta Blues. This was John Lee Hooker’s style and none played it better. But Hooker gave this earthy sound an almost free-form musical structure and combined it with non-rhyming blank verse to create a new urban sound, later known as the Detroit blues.
Many of Hooker’s early recording sessions were played solo because few other musicians could follow him. As San Francisco-based blues musician and producer Roy Rogers explained: “It may sound easy to play, but it’s not. He takes the music as far as he can and he leads with his voice, and much of it is improvised on the spot. Blues is really a music about how you feel and John embodies that.”
Hooker’s sound is unmistakable. His sparse guitar work, accompanied only by his constantly tapping foot and deep, almost growling, voice encapsulate the sound of contemporary blues with its deeply emotional mixture of good times and deep sadness. As Hooker once explained: “Sometimes on stage, when I’m singing them, it gets so sad and deep and beautiful, I have to wear dark glasses to keep the people from seeing me crying. I’m not kidding. The tears just start running. With the words that I’m saying and the way that I sing them, sometimes I give my own self the blues.”
Hooker’s standing among fellow musicians and artists is of the highest order. As blues guitarist and singer Bonnie Raitt commented last week: “John Lee’s power and influence in the world of rock, pop, R & B, jazz and blues are a legacy that will never die. Getting to know and work with him these last 30 years has truly been one of the greatest joys of my life.”
While this giant of post-war blues threatened to retire on a number of occasions in the last few years of his life, he did not give up performing. In fact, on the weekend before his death he had played two concerts in northern California, receiving standing ovations.
John Lee Hooker, who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991 and given a Lifetime Achievement Award at last year’s Grammy presentations, leaves behind a recorded legacy of over 100 albums and countless others under various pseudonyms. The musical world is certainly the lesser for his passing.
John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
Check Out Elwood’s Interview with John Lee Hooker
 ELWOOD: How you doing?
 JLH: Oh pretty good to be getting older every day and every year. Soon have a birthday. See, well I’m looking forward to it. I am never looking forward to it, but it’s always coming. It’s something you can’t do nothing about. Happy to be, to be living to see these birthdays, you know. And the people who loves me and all over the country and the world, they, they know I got one coming. That’s really proud, I’m really proud of that. So I’m doing pretty good.
 ELWOOD: Well that’s good.
JLH: For—the main thing about this, this life or this field, to me, I love people. And it shows when I play into my music. I love people and I’m a pretty humble person when it comes to that. I don’t look at how much money I got or how much success I got. I look at the people of the world who made it possible for me to be where I’m at today, you understand? And the success that they, that they give me.
I’m just always low key and loving people. I get out there. I like small honky-tonk places, the small bars, go in there and get up on the stand and sing a song or two and get myself a lite beer and get out. So I don’t, I don’t want to get in the home and hide out from people. Maybe I should, but I don’t. I want to sit there with them, you know. A lot of them be shocked and surprised to see me in these places. Oh, what is John Lee Hooker doing here? Well I mean, just like you to have some fun and some down-home blues. So that’s my life.
ELWOOD: It must be tough, too, because probably your manager or your agents, they want you to play Madison Square Garden or the Cow Palace.
JLH: Yes, it is tough, very tough. But, yes, for the money, it’s nice. But I think about the small places that I, that I come up in, you know, who brought me up in these small nightclubs and what I love so well. And the people they, and like you said, you said it right, but agents and the managers, they like you to play the big Madison Square Garden and the big money, yes, that’s true. I love it, but not as, not as much as I do the small club.
ELWOOD: So what were some of the clubs like when you were first starting, what were some of the clubs?
JLH: Well, like with the club in Detroit called Apex Bar. Wasn’t too much, about three times bigger than this room. And I loved it, and there, it’s a lot of, it’s the Apex Bar and place in Detroit there called the Black and Tan, had a lot of fun, small club. Stuff like that. And then when I got to be real famous and real big, I don’t play in clubs anymore, but my heart’s still there. And I be glad to get a chance, when I ain’t working, you know, get in my car and go to funky places. I will sit and have myself a beer and get the feeling and jump up on the bandstand, grab the mike and start singing, you know. Everybody gather around, aaaahhh. I like that.
ELWOOD: Yes. It’s real honest music, too. There’s no, you know, there’s no nonsense.
JLH: Oh, it’s real honest music. I go down to see so many blues singers in so many places. They ain’t making much money but they’re having fun. And, and I want to have fun with them, you know. Anyway I can reach out and get them by the hand, I’ll do it, you know. If I can give them a hand, I give them a helping hand, help them up to here like where I’m at, I’ll do it. I’ll be glad to do it. And I enjoy doing benefits, when it’s for the right thing, you know.

So many of them going on now you never know which is the right thing or not. You don’t know what they’re doing with the money. There’s so many of them going on. But I still like to reach out and get people, you know, that really need.

ELWOOD: Who are some of the people who helped you along the way?
JLH:Well the first person that really helped me, which don’t get any credit, but the best one gets all the credit but he shouldn’t get it. A guy in Detroit called Elmer Barber, 609 East Lafayette Street in Detroit. He’s the one that discovered me. He had a little old record shop there, down Lafayette and Senewa in Detroit. But anyway, I used to go to his shop at night. At day, every night I had a little job working, you know. And he had this little record shop. He would record records and stuff, blanks downstairs. They didn’t have tapes. They had these blanks, you know.

And I would go down, he’d take me there. He heard me, said, Oh kid, you got a voice. And he would take me there and record me and we sit down there, would eat and drink wine till about two or three o’clock in the morning. But every night, and I would sleep during the day whenever I wasn’t working, something like that. And sometime I had to work, too. And he is the one that really discovered me.

Then he brought me to Bunny Bessman on Woodward Avenue. They had a big, big record store, they did. Kind of like Tower Records, you know? And he had a little label called Sensation label. I walked in there, he came in there and they heard me, you know. They said, Oh kid. Said hey brother, where you find him and brought me. Oh, this is my talent. And he turned me over to Bunny.

And, and all these songs that I wrote, he had this little label put on his label, Sensation label, and he would tell people that he wrote the song, but you know, he never wrote a song. And he, you look on all of his, the records, you may see his name on a lot of them. I, you know, we won’t go there. But he did not discover me, but he made the way for me after Barber, Barber, you know, got me going. He’s the one that got me on Modern Record, the big label. Made me known after he got, after Barber, turned him over to me after Barber discovered me and turned me over to him. So he’s the one put the hype to me, to the big labels and like Modern Records and stuff like that. His label couldn’t handle Boogie Chillen. You might, you may, you heard of Boogie Chillen. It was a big one.

So I recorded it on Sensation label. And he released me out to Modern Records. But he had a small label and Modern had this big, big label. So that’s, then he, he claimed he wrote that, he didn’t. But he, that’s how I started out working for little plants in Detroit, little bars and going to what I grew up with, and loved so much which I do now.

I raised my family in Detroit and when I first come to Detroit I wasn’t married, come at a very young age. Then got married then, all my children was born in Detroit, grew up there. And I see the hard times and the good times that all are right there, and I come up the hard way. And I know what the hard way is. I know what it’s like to scuffle, coming through the hard times and getting into the big times and a big star. I know how to cope with it and I know what it’s like being, coming up in it the hard way. And I don’t forget that. And I don’t leave it behind. That’s always in the back of my mind, what you have to come through, most of them. It wasn’t handed to me on a silver platter. I got it through the hard times.

Now I have learned to appreciate that and to live with that. I won’t forget my roots, I don’t care who tried to get me to leave my roots behind and go be a superstar which they say I am, I don’t know. Or that’s fine, but I’m not going to leave that behind. I’m going to always stick to my roots, which I love the blues so much. Every day, every night when I lay down in my bed, I’m, I’m sometime I’ll be humming it in my sleep, tune that comes to me and people who I love.

I reach out and get people and I let them, just take them in and just, I give away so much to the people, I mean money-wise here, trying to help, you know, which are the poor people that who really needs it. You look at the people in the streets, sleeping in the streets, hard time. I wonder why these people have to do that. There were more people like me, we could get out and reach out there and get those people, I don’t think it would be, it would be a better world.

But I can’t save the world, but I can, I say I can be John Lee Hooker, not forget about the people, the poor people and the people that go out there and buy my records that work five days a week they work in the plants and the fields from buying John Lee Hooker’s records. And they is part of me, just as much as me. Wasn’t for them I wouldn’t be here. And that’s the reason I love people to death. Ain’t nobody going to change me from not doing that.

THEBLUESMOBILE.
on 21 September, 2012 at 05:54.
July 21, 1993.
.
http://thebluesmobile.com .
http://thebluesmobile.com/check-out-elwoods-interview-with-john-lee-hooker/
John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker photographed in San Francisco, CA March 20, 1992 © Jay Blakesberg/Retna LTD.
John Lee Hooker: A Biography 
John Lee Hooker is one of the original innovators and kings of African American popular music, commonly called the blues. He was born on August 22, 1917, in Clarksdale, Mississippi, to a Baptist minister. Later he became the stepson of William Moore, a guitarist. At the age of 14, he started singing with spiritual groups. Hooker learned his style of guitar playing from his stepfather.(Stratyner 112) He also learned to play from his colleagues, James Smith and Coot Harris. His style of guitar playing is known as two-finger picking.(Stratyner 112) His two-finger picking style is known as Deltalick
Hooker introduced a style to which every white blues band since 1962 must trace at least half their roots.(Stratyner 112). His guitar talks in snaky lines, in sitar quivers, in sudden shocks, and in hilly phrases. His songs are a monologue that retells a story of emotional pain that requires a unique verbal pattern. Hooker was the first great recorded practitioner of the electric blues-rock-funk and stream of consciousness boogie. Hooker likes to keep things simple. He rarely strays from a couple of cords and delivers his autobiographical blues with growing menace and much vibrato. He’s a completely closed-in performer who accents the rhythmic drive of his performance, according to Quallette, by “chopping off the ends of his rhythmic lines.”
When Hooker cut his first single, a stomping guitar boogie called, “Boogie Chillen” in 1948, the Mississippi native was working as a janitor in a Detroit steel mill.
The song became a hit, and Hooker quit his job to play full-time the hypnotic one chord country blues–sung in his preternatural growl–that he had learned from his stepfather.
In 1962, Hooker brought out another smashing hit, entitled Boom Boom, which is, according to Puterbaugh, “a rough uncut Hooker.” Hooker also has as an album on the market entitled Boom Boom. Hooker released this album in 1993.
In the late 70’s, Hooker appeared in the hit movie Blues Brothers. In the movie Hooker sang the smashing hit Boom Boom. Hooker has made many appearances in big places. In 1960, he performed at the Newport Folk Festival. In 1973, he was in a concert at the Lincoln Center. Hooker still also plays in many average clubs, but he has had the chance to work with numerous well-known people. To name a few, he’s worked with Eric Clapton, Muddy Waters, Albert King, Peg Leg Sam, Ginger Baker, and Chris Wood. He’s worked with a few rock groups such as the Rolling Stones and Animals.
Hooker, who is now 83 years old, has now made his home in Long Beach, California. His voice has deepened into a “throaty, lubricious vehicle for conveying pain, trouble desire, and wicked irony ” His guitar playing is “tangled and gnarly, the sound of a man groping for an honest expression of deep, disturbing feelings.” (Peterbaugh 81).  Until recently he sometimes  grabbed  the mike to perform when he’s just at the club having a night out (Drozdowski 63).  He is, however, in poor health now and has stopped making public appearances. Nobody sounds like John Lee Hooker. Mississippi’s John Lee Hooker is different. He is the king of the blues.
Editor’s Note: John Lee Hooker, the great bluesmen,  passed away in his sleep on  June 21, 2001, at his home in the San Francisco Bay area at the age of 83. Hooker influenced countless generations of musicians and inspired music fans around the world during his sixty-year career.
John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
From Hooker’s Official Web Site:   John Lee Hooker piled up more milestones in each of his final years than most artists compile in a lifetime. In February of 2000 John Lee received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Sciences (The Grammys). In October of 1999 “Boogie Man: John Lee Hooker In The American 20th Century,” a biography penned by noted author Charles Shaar Murray, was released in England. Earlier that year Hooker was awarded a lifetime achievement award by the Rhythm  and Blues Foundation and presented by Bonnie Raitt and Eric Clapton. Fall of 2000 saw the much anticipated release of the book in the United States and other parts of the world. 1999  was John Lee Hooker’s 50th year as a recording artist, and to celebrate, he released THE BEST OF FRIENDS on Virgin/Pointblank, a compilation album representing some of his best songs from the past ten years. The album features performances with John Lee and his friends including Van Morrison, Bonnie Raitt, Carlos Santana, Robert Cray, Ben Harper, Los Lobos, Charlie Musselwhite, Jimmie Vaughan and more.  In last years, John Lee was inducted into Los Angeles’ Rock Walk, the Bammies Walk of Fame in San Francisco, and he now has his own star on Hollywood Boulevard’s Walk Of Fame. In October  of 1998 he was honored with a tribute concert by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The concert featured some of his best friends including Eddie Kirkland, Charlie Musselwhite, Elvin Bishop and Johnnie Johnson. Film from that show was aired as part of a documentary on John Lee due for worldwide release the following year. In 1997, John Lee received two Grammy Awards for his latest  studio release, DON’T LOOK BACK. The first Grammy was for Best Traditional Blues Album and the second for his duet with Van Morrison beating out such notable artists as Barbra Streisand, Celine Dion, Stevie Wonder, Babyface, and Bryan Adams in the Best Pop Collaboration category.
Timeline
1917-Born in Clarksdale, Mississippi
1930-Hooker left home
1931-Hooker joined the army.
1940-Hooker made a demo for Bernie Benson
1948-Hooker cut his first single, Boogie Chillen
1955-Hooker started recording for Vee-Jay Records
1960-Hooker performed at the Newport Folk Festival
1961- Hooker album called “Boom Boom”
1965- Hooker was the first Delta bluesman to record along with a English rock band
1968-1969 -Hooker won major music award in Europe and the United States
1970-Hooker performed with the rock group Canned Heat and folk vocalist Bonnie Rait
1973-Hooker was paired with Muddy Waters and Mose Allison in the Blues Variations concert at Lincoln Center
1975-Hooker was paired with Albert King and folk harmonicist Peg Leg Sam in a Night of the Blues at the Brooklyn Academy of Music
1979-Hooker appeared at New York’s Lone Star Cafe
1992-Hooker at  71 years old wins a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Recording, is inducted into the  Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame
1995-Releases Chill Out
1997-  Hooker’s best Chess Sides (Chess 50th Anniversary)
1997-Records Don’t Look Back
1998- Best of Boom Boom
1999- I’m in the Mood [BGM International]
2000- Millennium Edition [Remastered]
2001–June 21, John Lee Hooker died at his home in the San Francisco Bay area at the age of 83.
Major Works
• Boogie Chillen
• Sally Mae
• Crawling King Snake
• Boom Boom
• Hooker ‘n’ Heat
• I’m Bad Like Jesse James
• One Bourbon, One Scotch, and One Beer
• House Rent Boogie
• Sugar Mama
• Hittin’ the Bottle Again
• Thought I Heard
• Same Old Blues Again
• Trick Bag (Shoppin’ for My Tombstone)
• Boogie at Russian Hill
• Bottle Up and Go
• I Ain’t Gonna Suffer No MoreBy Katine MacDonald (SHS)http://mswritersandmusicians.com/musicians/john-lee-hooker.html
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